the-actual-universe

Anonymous asked:

I was wondering if you've ever speculated or read anything about what will happen when Betelgeuse explodes? Will we have the equivalent of 24h sunlight for x number of days? Has there been any thought about what this might mean for Earth (particularly in terms of photosynthesis)?

the-actual-universe answered:

I’m honestly dying to be able to see a supernova in my lifetime, so I have looked into the topic somewhat. Here’s a couple things I have found:

For starters, though “Betelgeuse might explode soon!” makes for some great headline bait, “soon” in this context means “sometime within the next million years.” The odds aren’t great that we’ll get to watch it happen (but hey, you never know).

Secondly, it will definitely be bright, but it’s not going to help much in the garden. At 640 light-years distant, Betelgeuse is just too far away to have a significant impact on us. According to this great article by Phil Plait, it will be about 1/100,000th as bright as the Sun. The supernova may be bright enough to see during the day (!!!) but it’s too far away to have that kind of impact on our lighting situation. 

Hope that helps!

-RLO

anthraxorb

youngblackandvegan:

i think the only thing scarier than reading the comments white people make in youtube videos

is the realization that these people are real and walk among us

the same disgusting degenerate people spreading racist filth

could be your boss, neighbor, professor, dentist

your boyfriend/girlfriend/spouse

it’s terrifying

that they get to hide behind anonymity 

and live their lives

no one the wiser of just how racist they are

micdotcom

micdotcom:

7 powerful times music triumphed over censorship

2. Neil Young’s classic protest song destroyed American censorship.

While many were at a loss for words after four unarmed Kent State University students were shot to death by the Ohio National Guard on May 4, 1970, for protesting Richard Nixon’s Cambodian Campaign, one rock group composed a song that forever shaped our understanding of the events. Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young’s “Ohio” was quickly banned on local radio stations by Ohio Gov. James Rhodes, which only served to increase the song’s popularity, launching it to No. 14 on the Billboard Hot 100.

If there’s one way to make sure something is popular in America, make it forbidden.

Pirate radio basically launched BBC Radio 1 | Follow micdotcom